Article of the week! (annoying pop-ups)

Ganoderma Lucidum’s Anti Cancer Properties Investigated

Scientists have been investigating the medicinal properties of Ganoderma Lucidum and have been astounded by the results yielded so far. They’ve been particularly impressed by the powerful anti-cancer action Ganoderma appears to possess. Numerous studies have revealed that it can help prevent the spread of cancer, especially of the prostate, breast, liver and spleen…

Posted on December 14, 2009 at 5:19 pm by DaveReed · Permalink · 62 Comments
In: ganoderma

New article regarding Gano and arthritis

Immunomodulatory effects of lingzhi and san-miao-san supplementation on patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Xi Bao YKwok Wong CKwok Ming Li EShan Tam LChung Leung PBing Yin YWai Kei Lam C.

Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune joint disease. We evaluated a standard preparation of Lingzhi (Ganoderma lucidum) and San-Miao-San (Rhizoma atractylodis, Cortex phellodendri, Radix achyranthes bidentatae) capsules (TCM group) for its supplementary treatment efficacy for RA. There was no significant difference in the absolute count, percentage, and ratios of CD4(+)/CD8(+)/natural killer/B lymphocytes between the TCM and placebo groups after taking the capsules (all p > 0.05). There was no significant change in concentrations of plasma cytokines of interferon-gamma-induced protein-10 (IP-10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, monokine induced by IFN-gamma, regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted, interleukin (IL)-8, and IL-18 after taking the capsules for 8 and 24 weeks (all p > 0.05). The percentage change in ex vivo-induced level of inflammatory cytokine IL-18 was significantly lower in the TCM group than in the placebo group after taking the capsules for 24 weeks (p < 0.05). Therefore, Lingzhi and San-Miao-San capsules might exert a beneficial immunomodulatory effect in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Posted on November 29, 2009 at 6:31 pm by DaveReed · Permalink · 84 Comments
In: Uncategorized

Study of the Week

I was asked if Ganoderma was useful for Parkinson’s Disease and this is something I found. It’s U.S. Patent 7,357,933 and it looks good!

“Sporoderm-broken germination-activated ganoderma lucidum spores for protection of dopaminergic neurons and treatment of Parkinson’s disease.”

Posted on September 22, 2009 at 7:39 pm by DaveReed · Permalink · 103 Comments
In: ganoderma

Study of the week.

A mushroom (Ganoderma capense) lectin with spectacular thermostability, potent mitogenic activity on splenocytes, and antiproliferative activity toward tumor cells.

Ngai PH, Ng TB.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2004 Feb 20;314(4):988-93. 

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong, China.

An 18-kDa lectin, with an N-terminal sequence displaying slight similarity to some lectins and fungal immunomodulatory proteins, was isolated from the mushroom Ganoderma capense (Lloyd) Teng. It exhibited more potent mitogenic activity than that of concanavalin A toward mouse splenocytes, and antiproliferative activity toward leukemia (L1210 and M1) cells and hepatoma (HepG2) cells. The isolation procedure entailed ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC)-ion exchange chromatography on Mono S, and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex 75. D(+)-galactose and D(+)-galactosamine specifically inhibited the hemagglutinating activity of the lectin. The hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was not affected over the temperature range 0-100 degrees C and after exposure to 100 degrees C for 60min. The activity was stable in the pH range of 4-11, and after incubation with solutions of various chlorides (from 3.125 to 50mM) including NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), MgCl(2), ZnCl(2), MnCl(2), and AlCl(3). However, it was potentiated by 12.5-50mM FeCl(3). The lectin was devoid of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory and antifungal activities.

MeSH Terms:

Substances:

Publication Status: ppublish
PMID: 14751230 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Posted on August 25, 2009 at 8:51 pm by DaveReed · Permalink · 68 Comments
In: ganoderma

Linda McClure before and during.

Linda was gracious enough to let me scan a 3-year old pic and compare it to her new. The new pic was taken 4-5 days ago and shows her after ~6weeks of taking the Ganoderma capsules. First the before pic:

Linda McClure 3 years ago.

Linda McClure 3 years ago.

Now, after 6 weeks of taking the Ganoderma:

Linda McClure a week ago.

Linda McClure a week ago.

Note the great improvement in her skin!

Posted on August 6, 2009 at 8:06 pm by DaveReed · Permalink · 129 Comments
In: ganoderma

New affilliate – Master Eric Lee

Eric was good enough to sit down and discuss his feelings about the GanoExcel products. See the top of the A/V page for an excerpt.

Gano Excel customer and martial arts legend Eric Lee sat down to explain how our products help him maintain the energy necessary in his fast-paced line of work! Eric, who has appeared in such films as “Big Trouble in Little China” and “Bloodsport 2,” was intrigued by our combination of 100% organic Reishi Mushroom with bold chocolates, oatmeal, and other wholesome foods. For more information, check out:my Retail Sales site

Posted on August 6, 2009 at 6:54 pm by DaveReed · Permalink · 78 Comments
In: ganoderma

A bright future for all!

Today, friends, I want to speak of the future, the bright future for all, if we can make it.  We can only create what we can envision, and if we envision doom and gloom we will surely get it.  Certainly there are many ways to see death and destruction in our future, and we can become obsessed with them.  There’s plenty on the TV about the coming depression, lots on the net, too.  Maybe, just maybe, that’s what “they” want you to do.  Focus on the negative and it will surely come to pass.

Get away from the TV and Faux news.  Get off those negative websites.  Go out and talk to your friends and neighbors, visit your parents or children or brothers and sisters.  Help your neighbors and they will help you.  Sure you’ll find those who just take and take and take – I’ve known a few.  You’ll realize that soon enough and move on to those who help others.  Give with a pure heart and it will be returned to you twenty-fold!  Giving doesn’t expect a return – that’s trading.  Trading is fine, but giving is better, much better.

The sun still shines, the birds still sing and it’s still a beautiful planet full of wonderful opportunities for wealth and growth.

Posted on July 28, 2009 at 1:36 pm by DaveReed · Permalink · 119 Comments
In: Uncategorized

New Affiliate!

Today I went to see my acupuncturist Curtis Baumgartner L.Ac. He’s an acupuncturist, herbalist and educated in Traditional Chinese Medicine. He signed right up as a distributor. He enumerated all the people who would need the reishi right away. First, one of his office mates who is recovering from breast cancer. Her chemotherapy is done, but her t-cell counts (whatever that is) were going back up. He got a bottle for her. His housemate, who’s HIV positive gets a bottle. He himself wants another bottle, so he ordered one for himself, plus a couple more for around the clinic.

His office mate, Geoffrey said the reishi is like having your own personal sheriff. You take it and there’s a little guard looking after your well being.

Posted on July 25, 2009 at 6:16 pm by DaveReed · Permalink · 87 Comments
In: Uncategorized

Miracles

How do we recognize a miracle? What color is it? How big? How small? Does a miracle come in a bottle? In a can? Does it come in a brightly colored box? What does one smell like? What shape is it? Does it even have a shape? Is it a solid, a liquid or a gas? How can we tell?

Does a miracle come through the telephone? Through a letter? Through a computer? Will we know it when we see it? Can a miracle arrive from someone we don’t know? Someone we’ve never met or spoken with? Can we get one from some guy sitting at his computer? Can we get one from a blog? Are anonymous miracles even allowed?

When we pray for a miracle, do we disallow certain kinds of miracles? Do we say, “That’s not the miracle I was expecting”? Will we let someone else tell us “that miracle is not for you”. Will we believe them? Should we? Are there only “approved” miracles?

Is it that our expectation that miracles can come only from the sweeping hand of an invisible God? Can a miracle come by God acting through people? Can we create miracles? Can we take actions that make miracles happen? Can a miracle come from the united efforts of hundreds of people working in the mere physical realm, if indeed such a thing exists?

If a miracle comes in a bottle, will we open that bottle? Will we refuse to open the bottle because we don’t think they can come that way?

We go to our story.

A man is trapped in his house by rising flood waters. The voice on the radio had said to get out, but our man didn’t think it would be that bad, so he stayed. The waters continued to rise so the man had to take refuge on the roof. Being a religious person he prayed to God to be saved.

A little while later a boat came by and they said “Get in the boat”. The man said not to worry because God would save him. Since there were other people to rescue, the boat went on its way. Still the water continued to rise. The man was standing on the top of his chimney when a helicopter appeared and they yelled at the man, “Grab on”. The man yelled back that God would save him and the helicopter left.

Finally the water swept the man from his house and he drowned. He went to the “Pearly Gates” and there was God. The man said, “I prayed for you to save me. Why did you let me drown?”

God said, “I told you on the radio to get out. I sent a boat and then I sent a helicopter. What the hell did you expect?”

How do we recognize a miracle?

Posted on July 19, 2009 at 10:43 am by DaveReed · Permalink · 67 Comments
In: Uncategorized

UCLA & Cedars-Sinai study re: leukemia.

This is an abstract from a very important study regarding the effects of ganoderma regarding leukemia.  I don’t have the entire study, though those who have a high interest can obtain it. Follow the Elsevier pubs link. It costs $31.50 (US).

Below is the abstract from the study. Note the use of the term “profound”. These are medical research professionals.   They don’t use the term “profound” lightly.   If it was slight they would have said “slight”, likewise for “significant”, but they said “profound“.   I can’t emphasize this enough.  Note the word “apoptosis”, which means death.  In this use, it means the death of the cells of leukemia.

If you, or a loved one are suffering from leukemia, I would recommend you refer your medical professionals to this study.

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States. MullerCI@cshs.org

Ganoderma lucidum causes apoptosis in leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma cells.

Müller CIKumagai TO’Kelly JSeeram NPHeber DKoeffler HP.

Over many centuries, herbal remedies have treated a variety of ailments. This empiric observational approach has produced a number of leads for formulated medicines. Ganoderma lucidum extract was screened for its anti-proliferative activity using a panel of 26 human cancer cell lines. The six most sensitive hematologic cell lines were: HL-60 (ED50 26 microg/ml), U937 (63 microg/ml), K562 (50 microg/ml), Blin-1 (38 microg/ml), Nalm-6 (30 microg/ml) and RPMI8226 (40 microg/ml). Cell cycle analyses revealed a G2/M arrest, most prominently in HL-60 cells. Four hematopoietic cell lines (HL-60, Blin-1, U937, RPMI8226) were examined for apoptosis, which ranged between 21 and 92%. After exposure to G. lucidum extract, HL-60 cells became multinucleated with an increased DNA content. These results indicate that G. lucidum extract has a profound activity against leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma cells and may be a novel adjunctive therapy for the treatment of hematologic malignancies.

PMID: 16423392 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Posted on July 16, 2009 at 10:59 pm by DaveReed · Permalink · 36 Comments
In: ganoderma